All posts by Jill Dannis

Endeavor Awards – AOPA Writeup

Party under the space shuttle

Public benefit flying feted at Endeavor Awards

June 1, 2015
By Julie Summers Walker
0601_Endeavor_Banquet

The good pilots are doing to help others was given a Hollywood bash May 30 at the Los Angeles Science Center.

Movie stars and movie clips lent some Hollywood flair to the second annual Endeavor Awards, which combine celebrity, remarkable surroundings, and fanfare to honor those who contribute their time, money, and aircraft to help others. Hosted by “aspiring” pilot actor Greg Kinnear, the Endeavor Awards were created by Mark Wolper, a Hollywood producer and an active pilot who works extensively with Angel Flight West.

Honorees included 91-year-old pilot John Billings, who flies for Angel Flight Mid-Atlantic; Rick Durden, who flies for LightHawk; and Steve Purello, who flies for Angel Flight Southeast. Each received a $15,000 grant for their organization to help continue its work.

Billings, a retired Eastern Airlines captain who flew the B-24 Liberator in World War II, has flown more than 300 missions for Angel Flight. He places a stuffed animal in the seat of his aircraft for his passengers. “The greatest payment I get is a big hug,” he said after receiving his recognition. “That’s my salary.”

CONTINUE READING ON AOPA WEBSITE…

BloodworksNW celebrates 10 years with Angel Flight West

“BloodworksNW celebrates 10 years with Angel Flight West”

Guest Post from BloodworksNW Blog The Blood Line

1st-Flight-039

Most blood donors know that a pint of blood can save three lives because it can be separated into three components: red cells, plasma, and platelets. What you may not know is that this processing needs to done within five hours of drawing it from your arm. Otherwise, only the red cells are viable (up to 24 hours).

Between ferries, distance, and our region’s notoriously bad traffic, this critical time frame presents a challenge. BloodworksNW’s service area spans from Bellingham to Eugene and remote areas in between, but all blood is processed in our Renton laboratories.

We wouldn’t be able to save nearly as many lives without the special volunteers at Angel Flight West.

Angel Flight West is non-profit organization that primarily arranges free, non-emergency air travel for patients with serious medical conditions.

However, in May 2005, their all-volunteer crew of pilots began helping BloodworksNW transport thousands of units of blood each year from drives to our testing facilities, allowing us to process more units of platelets and plasma from whole blood and save more lives.

“The pilots are blood donors, in a way, because they create exponential value to the patients in the Northwest,” says Kyle McDaniel, Regional Operations Supervisor on our Transportation team, who has worked closely with Angel Flight West pilots for the past five years.

Angel Flight West typically only flies people, so it came as a surprise when they approached us about delivering blood.

This was perfect timing; the flights we previously relied on from private companies and commercial airlines for far-away pick-ups for all donated blood were costing our organization tens of thousands of dollars a year.

Continue Reading…

Alaska Air Blog: “Angel Flight West connects critically ill patients to life-saving medical care”

Posted on Alaska Airlines Blog on May 20, 2015 By Halley Knigge, Staff Writer

AF Pauline 1

In July 2014, Mike Rogers was given three months to live.

He’d been diagnosed with mesothelioma, a rare and aggressive tissue cancer. But Rogers and wife Betty weren’t willing to accept the prognosis.

“They told us he had three months to live,” says Betty. “We thought ‘No. No, no, no, no, no.’”

The Anchorage, Alaska, couple started to research, finding a cardiothoracic surgeon and expert on treating mesothelioma seemed to be the answer to their prayers. The only problem: he was based in Los Angeles; the Rogers, live thousands of miles north. And Mike was too sick to travel alone.

That’s when the Rogers learned of Angel Flight West – a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization that arranges free air travel for people with serious medical conditions. For patients in Alaska, all flights are on Alaska Airlines, which has contributed more than $12 million in in-kind donations to the organization since 1986.

Want to help? Donate miles today, by visiting alaskaair.com/charitymiles and selecting Angel Flight West from the drop-down menu.

Continue Reading on the Alaska Air Blog

Randy’s Alaska Air Angel Flight

FROM A PASSENGER by AFW Passenger Randy F.
Excerpt from AFW Winter 2015 Newsletter

I was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia in June 2014. I started chemotherapy the day after I was diagnosed. My oncologist let me know that I needed a bone marrow transplant and that they do not do these transplants in Hawaii. I needed to go to a facility on the mainland.

Fortunately for me, my brother was a match and we chose City of Hope in California for the procedure. The bone marrow transplant took place November 2014. I was in the hospital for one month and then two more months close by so City of Hope could monitor my progress. After approximately 100 days post-transplant I was released to return back home to Honolulu in February 2015.Untitled

I found out about Angel Flight West from my insurance plan case manager. I was asking her about the out-of-pocket airfare expenses I was going to have to pay to fly from Honolulu to L.A., and if it was covered under my insurance plan. She indicated it was not, but that there were several nonprofits that donated flights for cancer patients.

She sent me a multipage list of several different organizations to contact and mentioned that AFW was probably my best bet. When I first read how AFW works with pilots and plane owners donating their time and aircraft to patients needing transport, I did not think it applied to Hawaii since no small planes would make the journey! I went ahead and completed the “Request A Flight” on the angelflightwest.org website just in case, and received an email back with a phone number to call requesting more information. I called and provided the requested information but didn’t hear anything further.

On my next appointment with my oncologist, I asked his office manager, Gemma, about it and she indicated that AFW would want something from the doctor to indicate medical necessity and that she would take care of it.

A few days later, my wife was contacted by AFW saying we were approved for travel and that they would book a flight for us. We just had to let them know where and when! It was a Godsend! They booked a flight for both me and my wife to LA on Alaska Air. They told my wife when we were done with the bone marrow transplant and the doctor released us to go home, to call them for the return trip!

Four months later we called and they booked our return flight again on Alaska Air–no problem! The whole experience was nothing but great!

What did this flight mean for me? Having AFW cover our airfare to and from California from Honolulu was a huge help. Since both my wife and I had to leave work during this whole procedure we had no income, and with the added medical expenses growing that we were incurring, funds were extremely tight. Not having to worry about how we were going to pay for airfare was an enormous relief!

 

alaska

 

DONATE MILES TO ANGEL FLIGHT WEST

 

Safety Above All Else

Angel Flight West Command Pilots provide a great service for their passengers.  They volunteer to provide transportation because they want to help others.  Along with the desire to help comes the responsibility to ensure a safe trip.  Angel Flight West wants all Command Pilots to keep safety at the forefront as they plan and execute their missions.  With that goal, this section covers some of the key safety aspects to be considered when flying AFW missions.

Safe missions start with a pilot’s expectations or lack of expectations.  With that in mind, no pilot is expected to:

  • Accept any particular mission
  • Fly or continue a mission in the presence of any doubt about completing it successfully
  • Compromise safety in any way in order to complete a mission

Canceling a mission is considered a demonstration of good judgment and will never be criticized.  If these three tenets are kept in mind, then a pilot can expect to have an enjoyable time participating in Angel Flight West Missions.

Passenger Safety and Comfort

Angel Flight pilots often carry neophyte or low time General Aviation passengers.  These passengers may have concerns and fears and need some knowledge and personal management to ensure their comfort and safety.  To ensure the passenger’s safety and comfort, the pilot should:

  • Introduce general aviation to neophyte passengers.  The time spent providing a general explanation about flying to a passenger while doing an abbreviated walk around will often assuage a passenger’s concerns and fears.  One media induced misconception from both television and movies is that if the engine was to stop; an aircraft would immediately go into an almost uncontrollable dive.  A short  light hearted explanation that an airplane operating without an engine is simply a short winged glider can often abate that misconception and minimize any nervousness.
  • Manage your passengers on the ramp.  Passengers often don’t know about the dangers that airplanes present (like invisible spinning props).  Escort your passengers to and from your aircraft, making certain that everyone is under control.  This is especially important with children.  Make certain that your engines are shut down prior to enplaning/deplaning, and manage your passengers so they remain clear of other aircraft, whether the engines are operating or not.
  • Complete a thorough passenger briefing.  FAR 91.519 requires that a pilot provide a thorough passenger briefing for all passengers on every flight.  A good briefing includes explaining seat belt and shoulder harness operation, operation of entry doors and emergency exits, location and use of survival equipment, life jackets, and life vests, the use of oxygen masks, as well as what the passenger should and shouldn’t do during the flight.  From an operational standpoint, the passengers should be briefed on how to use headsets (and where to place the mic), the intercom (if equipped), the pilot’s preferred hand signals, and so forth.  Pilots should be prepared to communicate with passengers that are blind, deaf, or those who speak a language other than that which the pilot speaks.  For deaf passengers, ensure a paper and pen are available.
  • Seat belts on all passengers.  Seat belts should be worn at all times.  Young children and babies MUST be in appropriate children or baby seats and these seats should be attached to passenger seats and oriented correctly for the age of the child and type of seat.  No child seat should ever be attached to a front seat.
  • Sterile cockpit as required.  Passengers should be told that from engine start through the climb to cruise altitude is considered a “sterile cockpit” time where the passengers should only speak to the pilot if there are personal problems or issues or to assist the pilot (e.g. pointing out other aircraft).  The same “sterile cockpit” rule should apply from the pilot’s specified point on the descent to the destination through engine shut down.  The pilot should explain to the passenger(s) how they should get the pilot’s attention if they do have a problem or issue, and should notify the passenger when it is appropriate to speak freely.
  • Monitor weather conditions.  The pilot should continue to monitor weather conditions throughout the flight, especially if weather conditions warrant.  The pilot should use Flight Watch (122.0), an FSS, and/or onboard satellite weather.  If there are any questions regarding the weather, the pilot should create an alternate strategy, which may include returning to the departure airport, diverting to an alternate, or holding for the weather to clear.  If the weather makes a successful completion of the flight questionable, the pilot should discuss the weather and the options with the passenger and, together, agree to an alternative strategy.  Remember, however, that the Pilot in Command has the final decision.  A safe conclusion to any flight is the ultimate goal.
  • Monitor fuel usage & requirements.   During the flight, the pilot is expected to continually monitor fuel consumption and remaining fuel.  This becomes even more important if there are weather or other issues that may require a diversion or holding.
  • Use ATC/aircraft resources.  The pilot should avail himself of ATC’s resources if and when there is an issue of safety.  The passenger(s) can also be used as a resource where desirable.  For example, asking the passenger to watch for other airplanes is always a good use of the passenger.
  • Monitor your passenger’s condition.  Being constantly aware of your passenger’s condition can mean a great difference in the success of a flight.  If your passenger is uncomfortable for whatever reason, it is the pilot’s responsibility to initiate a response.  Often that will mean nothing more that providing fresh air or changing to an altitude that is smoother.  But if the passenger is physically uncomfortable, it might mean diverting to another airport or returning to the destination.  In extreme cases where the passenger’s condition might be life threatening, it might require declaring an emergency and flying directly to an airport located near suitable medical facilities.  If you encounter a questionable situation, declare an emergency and use the “Lifeguard” call sign.

The Eight Deadly Flying Sins

Studies done by the AOPA’s Air Safety Foundation and other organizations have identified a finite set of causative factors that lead to the majority of accidents with injuries and fatalities.  The ASF’s 2007 Nall Report statistics state that pilots were the cause of 73.8% of all GA accidents and 79.1% of all fatal accidents.  If a conscientious pilot avoids the following traps it minimizes the likelihood of an accident.

  • Fuel Mismanagement.  Fuel mismanagement constituted nearly 9% of all GA accidents.  Whether it is running out of fuel or fuel starvation even though there is fuel onboard, this type of accident happens nearly twice a week and is almost always avoidable.
  • Overloaded and/or Out of CG.  General aviation aircraft are reasonably limited in terms of payload and CG.  Each aircraft’s documents contain the aircraft’s official “weight and balance” paperwork so the pilot can ensure the aircraft as loaded is safe to fly.  An overloaded aircraft doesn’t perform at POH performance values, the stall speed is higher than normal, and an aircraft that is out of CG can be uncontrollable.
  • High Density Altitude Operations.  All pilots should always be aware of the performance robbing effect of density altitude.  Density altitude is an insidious danger because it doesn’t have to be particularly hot for it to have a major impact on an aircraft’s takeoff and climb performance, especially at heavy weights.
  • Takeoffs and Landings Accidents.  Although typically not deadly, landings and takeoffs are responsible for an inordinate number of accidents each year.  According to the Nall Report, almost 57% of all accidents happen during takeoff or landing.  Not surprisingly, a full 40% happened during landing.  Wind and turbulence, unextended landing gear, loss of control, and midair collisions on final, are some of hazards of airport operations.
  • Maneuvering Accidents.  Maneuvering flight has been the number one cause of fatalities in general aviation.  During the last ten years, more than one-quarter of all fatal accidents happened during maneuvering flight.  Low altitude maneuvering accidents are usually fatal and often, but not exclusively, the result of a pilot operating an aircraft in marginal weather conditions.
  • Continued VFR Flight into IMC Conditions.  Almost always deadly, and not just the purview of VFR pilots, continued VFR flight into IMC conditions is usually 100% fatal to non-instrument rated pilots, and surprisingly enough, claims instrument rated pilots as well.
  • Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT).  CFIT accidents are usually attributed to IFR operations, but CFIT accidents also happen during VFR operations, especially at night.
  • Must Complete the Flight Mindset.  Also referred to as get-home-itis, pilots of all ratings and hours have succumbed to the desire to complete the flight and ended their flights in a tragic way.  AFW’s passengers and missions can encourage an unaware pilot to fall into this trap.

Angel Flight West’s Potential Risky Mindset

AFW pilots are subject to all of the Eight Deadly Sins listed above, but the one that may be most compelling to an ”angel flight” pilot is the last one, a pilot’s desire to complete a flight in the face of risk.  After all, an AFW mission isn’t just a personal flight, it is a flight to help someone in need.  The pressure to complete the flight might come from some of the following motives:

  • Carrying an Unknown Person as Passenger.  It is sometimes more difficult to disappoint a stranger than someone you know.
  • Awareness of Passenger’s Personal Needs.  As an “angel flight” pilot we want to help our passengers.  The more we know about the person and their needs the more we want to make sure we deliver them to their destination.
  • Signed up for the Mission.  Pilots have a strong personal motivation to complete what they start.  When a pilot signs up for a mission, it is their nature to complete the mission.
  • Personal Obligations Afterward.  If a pilot has personal obligations after a mission, there will be pressure to complete the mission.
  • Proximity to the Destination.  The closer the aircraft is to the destination, the greater the desire to complete the flight.

Read more HERE!

Endeavor Awards Live & Silent Auction

https://afids.angelflightwest.org/donation/endeavorTicketsEndeavor Awards - Tickets On Sale Now

Aviation Goes to the Movies
Join Host Greg Kinnear for a Magical Evening

Angel Flight West Presents

2015 Endeavor Awards Ceremony & Gala
Saturday, May 30, 2015
Samuel Oschin Space Shuttle Endeavour Pavilion California Science Center in Los Angeles

www.endeavorawards.org

Live Auction Items

 

Go on vacation to Hawaii aboard a Gulfstream IV
with your family and friends.
Value: $80,000

Three experiences with Sean D. Tucker in one package! Aerobatic Flights  •  Golf  •  Dinner
Value: Priceless

 

Silent Auction Items

 

Yuneec Typhoon Q500+ Aerial Photography & Videography Drone with personal instruction in Los Angeles area.
Value: $1,400

Hacienda de los Santos Resort & Spa
Romantic Fly-in Mexican Resort Package.
Value $2,500
Space Shuttle Model 1/100 Scale Signed by Astronauts
Attending Endeavor Awards in 2014 & 2015.
Value of Model $150 | Opening Bid $500
Round of Golf for two with Greg Kinnear
at the Bel-Air Country Club.
Value: Priceless
Aerial Photograph on Canvas 24″ x 36″
Centennial Valley by Christopher Boyer,
Value $600
 List in process. Full details for all items available at the event.
endeavor post 1endeavor post 2

AFW Volunteers Rock!

National Volunteer Week is April 12-18, 2015. Angel Flight West would not exist if not for our incredible volunteers, from our volunteer pilots to our volunteers on the ground. We have a huge network of volunteers who fly for us, help us in the office, drive passengers to and from treatment, attend conferences to exhibit for AFW,  and do in-service presentations. To wrap up National Volunteer Week, we want to let everyone know why we think our volunteers are some of the best out there! 🙂

53 (2)

Angel Flight West volunteers are awesome because they are. . .

  • Flexible
  • Inspirational
  • Thoughtful
  • Selfless
  • Empathetic
  • Respectful
  • Talented
  • Safe
  • Enthusiastic and ready to work
  • Dedicated to using their time to help people
  • Willing to take on  on multiple projects that help us with our time management
  • Willing to go the extra mile for our passengers (both literally and figuratively!)

THANK YOU to each and every AFW volunteer. Your work makes all the difference in the world for so many people every single day.  We are truly grateful for all of your hard work.

 

 

Hear From Our Passengers

Want to hear what our passengers have to say about Angel Flight West?

Check out some reviews below, and then head over to our Passenger Survey Feedback page to see more!

Mission: 181598-1 on 10-03-2014 Passenger: Douglas H. (Post stem cell transplant (leukemia)
At one time I didn’t think there were good people left . I am so thankful for the pilots and you. You have found the best people ever that have chosen to share their time and tools to help others. All of you are amazing
Volunteer pilot Jeffrey Siegel flew passenger Doulas from Salt Lake City UT to Moab UT.  
Mission: 181323-1 on 09-10-2014 Passenger: Gary P. (Brain tumor)
the service is a Godsend!!!!
Passenger Gary P. flown from Redding to Bend by Volunteer Pilot John Hayes.  
Mission: 181021-1 on 08-16-2014 Passenger: Ashley W. (Endometriosis and Breast cancer)
All of the pilots were incredibly sensitive to my post operative pain and were very helpful! Can’t stop raving about you guys!!! Definitely the biggest blessing in the entire trip!
Pilot Hunter with passenger Ashley and her companion.  
Mission: 179685-1 on 06-17-2014 Passenger: Nancy P. (Breast Cancer)
All flights have been wonderful, on time, in contact, no worries events. All pilots have been kind and friendly and happily told me all about the various controls that I asked about, out of curiosity. I’m just waiting for a surgery date right now.
Passenger Nancy is being flown from Oakland CA to Fresno CA by volunteer pilot Bill Vierra.  
Read more at http://www.angelflightwest.org/donate/passenger-survey-feedback

Newton Foundation Donor Advised Fund of the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole Grant

Angel Flight West recently received a grant from the Newton Foundation Donor Advised Fund of the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole. This generous grant will support AFW operations.

Thank you to the Newton Foundation Donor Advised Fund of the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole  for your recurring support of Angel Flight West. Your support allows us to continue to give the gift of flight!

Learn more about the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole here.